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Sunday, July 23, 2017

A Monstrous Muddle for Evolutionists

Way back when, scientists thought that the platypus was a prank, what with looking like it was built from spare parts and all, and being unfriendly to evolutionary classifications. Jump forward about 150 years from the "you gotta be kidding me" time, and we get another one: a fossil called Tullimonstrum, or the Tully Monster. Not the kind of monster that will jump out and eat your car, since it was 10 cm (4 inches) long.


Credit: Wikimedia Commons / Nobu TamuraCC BY-SA 4.0
This, too, looks like it came from spare parts. Seems like scientists would be suspicious, since it was first discovered in the 1950s in Illinois, and no other fossils appear to have been found. Darwinists have dust-ups over how to classify the thing, and you'll find articles about the mystery being solved, no it is not, and so on. I suspicion that this was made by our Creator to remind us that there's still very much that we don't know.
From a biologist’s perspective, a few identifying clues stand out—but only a few. One is that it had a notochord. A notochord is a stiff rod made of cartilage that runs down an animal’s back like a backbone, providing support while it is an embryo. All vertebrates and some invertebrates have notochords. In vertebrates, the notochord can later become part of the vertebral column. This makes it an important clue to one of the most basic distinctions in biology: was the Tully monster a vertebrate or an invertebrate?
To read the entire article in context (or download the MP3), click on "How to Solve a Monster Mystery".

The "Tully Monster" is a strange creature known from fossils, and those are found in only one area. It defies evolution, but is not a problem for biblical creationists.